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Lundi 16 Décembre 2019

Salle de Presse

‘Juvenile justice laws need to change’

Monday 15th of July 2019 | Asie, Népal
The Himalayan Times
Nouvelle

Child rights defenders say laws related to juvenile justice need to be changed to make them compatible with international practices.

Advocate Rabindra Bhattarai said Section 21 of the Child Act — which stipulates that police can take accused juveniles under control and keep them under surveillance — is flawed as it gives power to police authorities to keep juveniles under virtual custody.

“Police often keep juveniles along with accused adults,” he said.

Section 36 (2) of the Child Act stipulates that if a juvenile between the age of 10 and 14 is found guilty of a crime carrying jail term, then he can be sent to jail for up to six months depending upon the seriousness of the crime and, or, be sent to a correction home for up to one year.

Another child rights defender Tarak Dhital said this provision contradicted the concept of juvenile justice.

“Juveniles should be sent to correction homes, not jails, but this provision does not distinguish between jail and correction home,” he added.

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